Hunting Hazards to Avoid for a Successful Season

‘Tis the peak of hunting season.

Hunters far and wide have successfully exempt themselves from Holiday gatherings to pursue their passion. treestand-1-300x300

Given this feat, we want to ensure optimal success and the best holiday hunting experience possible by helping hunters avoid some of the most common hunting mishaps identified in scientific studies, seen in emergency centers and reported among hunters in the field.

Among the most reported hunting accidents include:

  • Hunting/Tree Stand Accidents
  • Misfire/Shooting Accidents
  • Field Dressing Dangers

According to a recent study, “hunting mishaps most frequently occurred because of overexcitement, unfamiliarity with equipment, or carelessness.” The study, which reviewed the hospital records of 100 male patients between the ages of 10 and 78 showed a wide variety of injuries resulting from hunting activities.  “Almost half of the patients were injured during a 9-day gun deer hunting season.”  The study concluded that while many of the injuries were minor, serious morbidity with potential long-term disability and costs in time and money can occur [1].

Tree Stand Accidents

Tree stands situated 20-30 feet in the air present a hazard potentially as dangerous as the weapons accompanying hunters in the trek up and down.

According to Tree Stand Safety Awareness (TSSA), tree stand accidents are the number one cause of serious injury and death to deer hunters – estimating that more than one-third of hunters who use tree stands will be involved in a fall sometime in their hunting careers [2].

While broken bones are very common following a fall from a stand (arm fractures, hip fractures, as well as injuries to the head, neck and spine), others less frequently discussed involve jewelry/accessories.

A potentially limb and life-threatening injury that is completely avoidable among hunters involves jewelry/accessories – watches and rings in particular.  During a slip or fall from a stand, these objects can catch on parts of the stand, as well as nails and tree branches causing serious damage to the affected limb.  The catch/pull/hanging of the watch or ring during a fall, traumatically impacts the soft tissue of the impacted region.  This can result in a severe wrist fracture for watch wearers and traumatic ring avulsion for ring wearers, which can strip tendons and nerves from the bones of the finger.

The severity of either injury is long lasting – surgery and rehabilitation required in both cases. Additionally, hunters are often located in remote areas, and treatment of such a severe injury is delayed – impacting outcome.

Hunters are urged to ensure tree stand safety by wearing a full body harness and leaving watches and rings at home.  A system of communication with fellow hunters is also encouraged should a mishap occur.

Misfire/Shooting Accidents

Many of the injuries seen during hunting season involve a shooting accident.  These accidents often occur when hunters are overly eager and fail to adhere to a basic safety protocol – proper attire, weapon check and communication.  Shooting accidents also occur when drowsy hunters fall from their stands with weapon in hand.  These accidents can cause self-inflicted injuries as well as injury to nearby hunters.

According to the International Hunter Education Association (IHEA), approximately 1000 people in the US and Canada are accidentally shot by hunters every year – just under a hundred of those accidents are fatalities.  Hunter safety courses are strongly encouraged and required in some cases before hunt participation.

Field Dressing Dangers

Another opportunity for injury occurs during the process of field dressing.  Not only is the rapid cleaning of hunted game essential to prevent bacteria from growing on the surface of the carcass (at initial wound site or while gutting) and contaminating the meat, but also to reduce risk of dangerous infection if cut during the process.

Field dressing must be done as soon as possible to ensure rapid body heat loss. Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40°F and 140°F, in some cases doubling in number every 20 minutes. This range of temperature is often called the “temperature danger zone [3].” Hunters in warmer climates should be particularly vigilant.

Too often most of the hunting preparation is focused on the kill and not enough on safely field dressing the game.  Dull knives and dirty prep areas can result in lacerations prone to infection. These types of infected wounds can be difficult to treat.  Additionally, many types of popular game are infected with Brucellosis, an infectious disease caused by bacteria.  Hunters merely handling the blood and organs of an infected animal while field dressing can become infected.  The infection may remain dormant up to a month after exposure and can cause severe illness requiring antibiotics. Symptoms include fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle and joint pain [4].

Field dressing preparation should include:

  • Clean, sharp knife
  • Resealable plastic storage bags
  • Whetstone or steel for sharpening
  • Cooler full of ice/snow
  • Rope or nylon cord
  • Disposable plastic gloves
  • Clean wipes or paper towels
  • Clean drinking water

Be safe and Happy Hunting!

References

  1. Huiras CM, Cogbill TH, Strutt PJ. Hunting-related injuries. Wis Med J. 1990 Oct;89(10):573-6.
  2. Bailey C. Here are the Five Most Common Hunting Injuries. Wide Open Spaces. 2017 March 29. http://www.wideopenspaces.com/these-are-the-5-most-common-hunting-injuries/
  3. PennState Extension. Proper Field Dressing and Handling of Wild Game and Fish. 2017. https://extension.psu.edu/proper-field-dressing-and-handling-of-wild-game-and-fish
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Hunters: Protect Yourself from Brucellosis. https://www.cdc.gov/features/huntersbrucellosis/index.html

 Dr. Korsh Jafarnia is a Houston based board-certified, fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in the hand, wrist and elbow. He is recognized locally and nationally as a “top doctor” in his field and highly sought for his level of expertise in hand and upper extremity orthopedic care.

Hoverboard Hazards

The exciting new phenomena of “hoverboarding” has made hoverboards one of the most popular technological “toys” on the market today.  Intended for agile adolescents, its appeal has also drawn parents and other adults nostalgic for those days gone by.

The technology of the hoverboard, known as a smartboard or balance board as well, doesn’t actually create a hover but rather a forward and backward motion on a sideways skateboard of sorts, with either a large single center wheel or two smaller ones at each end.  It is automated, can reach a formidable speed of 16 mph and relies on body movement for navigation. It is basically a hands free, self-balancing electric scooter.

Concern over hoverboard safety grows amid increase in injuries.

Concern over hoverboard safety grows amid increase in injuries.

They have become the vehicle of choice for students travelling around campus and preteens maneuvering around the house and down the street to visit friends.  They light up, are stealth quiet, move as fast as one’s imagination …. and leave hands free for any other activity desired on the fly.

Unfortunately, while the mainstream hoverboard never actually leaves the ground, its ability to send riders airborne is causing increasing concern.

In fact, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has reported receiving dozens of hoverboard-related injuries from across the United States.  Houston hospitals have also reported in a recent Associated Press article seeing a sharp increase in the number of hoverboard accidents sending adult and young riders alike to the ER and urgent care clinics.

Colleges are not only restricting their use on campus, as a result of the injury risk (to the user and passers by) but also the fire hazard their electrical system poses.  The hoverboard fire hazard is covered extensively in other hoverboard reports.

Among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen from hoverboard use include concussions, fractures, contusions and abrasions.

Concussions

While most frequently seen in sports such as football and soccer, concussions are increasingly reported in hoverboard accidents.  With no recommended safety wear, the speed and maneuverability of the device is resulting in high impact falls and collisions – resulting in concussions. The primary symptoms of a concussion include:

  • Headache
  • Trouble concentrating, feeling “foggy”
  • Nausea
  • Delayed reaction times
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness
  • Sensitivity with bright lights or loud sounds
  • Irritability

 If a concussion is suspected, an evaluation should be conducted by a physician and hoverboard and other balancing activities should be avoided.

Fractures

Wrist fractures are among the most common types of fractures seen in hoverboard accidents – distal radius fractures among the most common type of wrist fracture.  This is often the result of breaking a fall or harsh impact with an outstretched arm. Other hoverboard fractures and dislocations have been seen in the fingers. Symptoms of a fracture or dislocation can be evident with extreme pain, swelling and slight disfigurement or subtle with only slight swelling and pain.

Most wrist fractures and finger fractures and dislocations can be treated nonsurgically, depending on the severity of the fracture or dislocation.  A splint or other bracing may be indicated, along with anti-inflammatory medication and rest/refrain from extracurricular activity.

Contusions and Abrasions

Collisions causing contusions and abrasions are frequently reported on hoverboards in the absence of safety gear. While most are minor cuts and scraps, some may result in open wounds requiring stiches, while potentially damaging nerves and other soft tissue.  Swollen, discolored injuries lasting more than a month should be further evaluated by a physician.

Preventing Hoverboard Injuries

The lack of safety standards and recommended safety gear/wear is a concern among hoverboard retailers and healthcare providers alike.  But, parents do not have to wait until such recommendations are established.  If a hoverboard is in your family’s future, take the proper precautions. As with any sport, safety gear recommended or not, will provide a bit of assurance.

Cyclists travelling at much less speeds not only have both hands and legs navigating a two-wheeled structure designed for the road, but also helmets, gloves, shoes and other gear designed for safety and the sport. This is also true of rollerbladers and skateboarders. Invest in the safety of your hoverboard rider and purchase protective safety gear.

Help young riders understand the potential risks for injury and encourage that they err on the side of caution to avoid the ER.

Have fun and be safe!

Read a hoverboard article from a young contributing writer.

 

Summer Sideliners

Common summer injuries of the hand, wrist and elbow

As we hike, bike, raft and climb our way through summer adventure, mishaps are bound to happen.  Some of the most common we see include wrist fractures, tennis elbow syndrome and cuts and lacerations to the hand.

Recognizing and treating mishaps that may occur while maximizing these brief few summer months can make a difference in how ready we are for all that awaits us in the fall.

Wrist Fractures

The wrist is susceptible to injury, often used as a first line of defense to break a fall, shield us from impact and soften a blow.  The wrist is comprised of eight small carpal bones, two forearm bones (radius and ulna) and four articulations or joints – which allow the wrist to bend and straighten, move from side-to-side and twist with a broad range of motion.  A force to the hand and wrist may result in a fracture of any one or several of these bones.  While a fracture to one of the smaller carpal bones may only be visible on x-ray, more common distal radius fractures are usually evident – crooked or deformed in appearance.  A wrist fracture may cause pain and swelling and should be immediately addressed.

Tennis Elbow Syndrome (Lateral Epicondylitis)

Though named for the sport frequently causing the condition in tennis players, Tennis Elbow Syndrome is in fact most often caused by everyday activity and diagnosed in those who have never played tennis.  Affecting the outside (lateral) portion of the elbow, tennis elbow syndrome is considered an “overuse” condition.  It is the result of strain placed on the muscles and tendons that attach to the bone.  Also caused by trauma, tennis elbow syndrome can cause pain with gripping, lifting and grasping.

Cuts and Lacerations

Cuts and lacerations to the hand are very common during the summer months as our hands are integral in most outdoor activity and projects. Tendon lacerations are also often the result of trauma to the hand or fingers.  Tendon lacerations may affect either the flexor or extensor tendons.  These types of lacerations often also result in other deep structure damage and require surgical repair.  The cut ends of a tendon must be brought back together in order for the cells inside the tendon to begin the healing/repair process.  Preventing infection in an open wound is also a primary concern with these types of injuries.

 

The Different Types of Fractures

A fracture is a break in the bone. Within the hand and upper extremity it can occur anywhere from the fingertip to the shoulder.

Among the most common fractures and dislocations of the hand and upper extremity include:

  • Finger Fractures
  • Distal Radius Fractures (also called Colles Fracture)
  • Scaphoid Fractures
  • Forearm Fractures
  • Clavicle Fractures (collar bone)

There are a number of different types of fractures – partial or complete, simple or compound, clean or shattered …each with their own classifications.  It is important to first define the type of fracture and its severity before determining the most effective treatment plan.

Fractures are defined by the severity of the break and the impact it imposes to surrounding tissue. Some fractures known as partial fractures may only cause a slight crack in the bone, while others may result in a complete break or shattered bone.

A fracture may also be either open or compound, which is a fracture that pierces through the skin creating an open wound.  A closed or “simple” fracture is a fracture that does not break through the skin.

Other classifications that help determine the best treatment plan for your type of fracture include:

  • Transverse Fracture – A fracture that goes across the bone and is situated at a right angle to the long axis of the bone.
  • Greenstick Fracture – A fracture situated on only one side of the bone, causing a bend but not a complete break. These are most commonly seen in children with more “pliable” bones.
  • Comminuted Fracture – A fracture that results in three or more bone fragments.
  • Intra-articular Fracture – A fracture with joint involvement.

Depending on the severity of the fracture, treatment may entail the non surgical realignment of the bone and casting, also referred to as closed reduction. Or surgical repair utilizing fixation support may be indicated.

Wrist Fracture – Distal Radius Fractures Among the Most Common Wrist Fractures

X-ray of a Distal Radius Fracture, also known as a Colles Fracture

One of the most common hand and upper extremity fractures we see is a distal radius fracture.  This is because of its position at the end of the forearm bone where it meets the wrist and the essential involvement of our hands and wrist in everyday activities and sports.  Our hands and wrists are also the first line of defense in a trauma – used as a shield to soften the blow of a harsh impact or to break a fall.

There are many opportunities to injure the distal radius.

The radius is the larger of the two bones located in the forearm. “Distal” radius refers to the lower end of this bone where it meets the wrist. The other forearm bone is the ulna, and together these two bones form the radioulnar joint.

Also called a “Colles” fracture for the anatomist who first described it, a distal radius fracture is common among those involved in contact sports as well as those suffering from osteoporosis.  It is occasionally misdiagnosed as a sprain and improperly treated – which could eventually lead to joint instability and osteoarthritis.

Some of the symptoms associated with a distal radius fracture include:

  • Swelling
  • Weakness and reduced range of motion
  • Persistent pain
  • Possible numbness
  • Deformity

Once identified, initial treatment will depend on the severity of the fracture, other soft tissue damage, and the type of break (simple or complex).  A wrist fracture may be treated non surgically by manipulating the broken sections back into place (closed reduction) and stabilizing the wrist with a splint.  More severe breaks may require surgical repair.

Next month’s blog will discuss how fractures are categorized and how they determine the treatment selected.