Motorized Mobility Mishaps Increasing on College Campuses

The abundance and popularity of motorized vehicles, like Bird Rides and LimeBikes, on college campuses are changing transportation norms faster than the development of new safety guidelines and regulations. [1] As a result, the number of accidents and injuries related to motorized mobility scooters (MMS) are on the rise.

Students can pick up scooters wherever they’re left and head to class or meet up with friends – with bookbag and cellphone in hand, though without a helmet or operating instructions.  The scooters have no designated travel lane, and buzz alongside pedestrians, cyclists and motorists at a speed of 15 miles per hour. Additionally, the short wheel base and small wheel size of the scooter makes it more unstable than a bicycle and vulnerable to debris or uneven pavement.

And if that combination doesn’t raise the hazard flag up the pole fast enough, these young MMS operators are often distracted by their cell phone as well – continuing to text and check messages while in route…

According to a recently published study, ‘low-energy as well as high-energy crashes involving the motorized mobility scooters may result in serious injuries and sometimes death.’ The study suggests that “awareness by multidisciplinary treatment teams may help to avoid underestimation of injury severity. MMS drivers need to improve their driving skills in order to reduce the number of MMS crashes.” [2]

Orthopedic specialists are seeing an increase in hand and wrist fractures, which include distal radius fractures and boxer’s fracture as well as severe lacerations, concussions and neck injuries – resulting in some undergoing repair surgery over this past winter break before returning for spring semester. [3]

Following a study conducted by the Journal of the American Planning Association on pedestrian and cycling traffic, three specific “danger zones” involving more serious crashes and injuries were identified – campus activity hubs, campus access hubs and through traffic hubs. [4]

Recommendations to reduce risk of accident and injury for this population may also prove effective in reducing risks to the growing MMS operating population.

Students are encouraged to avoid distraction while using an MMS and recognize that its speed and instability can increase risk of injury if safety precautions are not taken.

References

  1. A Flock of electric scooters suddenly descended on Austin. Now the city is scrambling to regulate them.  Reported in the Texas Tribune (May 1, 2018).  Located online:https://www.texastribune.org/2018/05/01/flock-electric-scooters-suddenly-descended-austin-now-city-scrambling-/.
  2. Leijdesdorff HA, van Dijck JT, Krijnen P, Schipper I. Accidents involving a motorized mobility scooter: a growing problem. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2014;158:A7858.
  3. That electric scooter might be fun. It also might be deadly.  Reported on CNN online (October 1, 2018).  Located online: https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/29/health/scooter-injuries/index.html.
  4. Loukaitou-Sideris A, Medury A, Fink C, Grembek O, Shafizadeh K, Wong N. Crashes on and near college campuses:  A comparative analysis of pedestrian and bicyclist safety. Journal of the American Planning Association. 2014;80(3):198-217.  https://doi.org/10.1080/01944363.2014.978354.