Hand and Wrist Pain in Exercise – Can Make it Hard to Power Through

Hand and wrist pain in exercise can affect men and women, young and mature alike.  From weightlifting and exercise machines to pushups, injuries and conditions can result from the repetitive stress of the activity or the sudden frequent exposure (training in an off season, sudden increase in weights or repetitions, new exercise program, etc.).

Powering Through

Exercise Impact on the Hand & Wrist

The hand and wrist conditions most commonly associated with these types of exercise regimens is tendinitis. Other less common injuries include stress fractures of the wrist.

If not addressed, pain and restricted hand and wrist function could hinder proper form during the activity and cause more serious injury.

Tendinitis – Symptoms and Diagnosis

Tendinitis is the inflammation of the tendon resulting from micro-tears that occur when the “musculotendinous unit” (muscular and tendinous tissue and its ability to be stretched) is severely overloaded with a excessive or sudden tensile force (resistance of a material to a force tending to tear it apart).

It can also be associated with Tendinosis, which is the degeneration of the tendon’s collagen in response to chronic or repetitive overuse.

Symptoms can vary depending on the area affected.  When affecting the fingers, symptoms can be similar to those experienced with trigger finger – catching or locking when bent.

Occurring where a tendon attaches to bone, other symptoms of tendinitis include:

  • Pain and/or tenderness in the hand or wrist when lifting weights
  • Possibly mild swelling

Tendinitis is confirmed upon physical examination and discussion of patient history.  It is generally resolved by resting and refraining temporarily from the activity causing the strain.  If this does not resolve the condition, anti inflammatory medications and hand therapy exercises may be recommended.  Only in extreme cases of tendon damage is surgery considered.

Stress Fractures – Symptoms and Diagnosis

A stress fracture is an overuse injury which occurs when muscles become fatigued – unable to absorb added shock therefore transferring the stress overload to the bone.  This can cause a tiny crack in the bone and is called a stress fracture.  While stress fractures are most commonly seen in the lower extremity, they can occasionally occur in the wrist when subjected to excessive strain or repetitive stress activity such as increasing the amount or intensity of an activity too rapidly.

A stress fracture can sometimes be confirmed on an x-ray, though may not be visible for several weeks despite the pain.  If necessary, a computed topography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be indicated to confirm the fracture.

Among the most effective treatments for a stress fracture is rest from the activity that caused the fracture for approximately six to eight weeks.  Resumption of activity before proper healing can result in a more serious fracture and potentially chronic problems.

Reducing Risks

There are a number of things that those engaged in weightlifting or related exercise program can do to reduce these types of hand and wrist injuries and conditions.

  • Build up gradually to increased weight and reps
  • Wear wrist guards or protective gloves (minimizing pressure and providing wrist assist)
  • Taking breaks to rest the hands and wrist
  • Using proper technique/form  

Learn more about common hand and wrist injuries and conditions. 

 

 

Platelet Rich Plasma Procedure, Among the Latest in Less Invasive Hand & Upper Extremity Treatment Options

While research efforts continue to assess the benefits of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of some orthopedic injuries and conditions, the clinical results for many, including some high-profile athletes such as Tiger Woods and Pittsburgh Steelers, Troy Polamalu and Hines Ward, are proving favorable.

PRP therapy is thought to accelerate healing by using the patient’s own “platelet rich plasma” and growth factors.  A small amount of a patient’s blood is taken and rotated in a centrifuge to separate red blood cells from platelets.  The concentrated platelets are then re-injected into the affected area – releasing growth factors that are believed to help the tissue recover more quickly.  The procedure is performed on elbows, shoulders, knees, hips and feet.

Initially PRP therapy was used to help athletes recover more quickly from an injury, accelerating recovery of arthroscopic cartilage and ligament repair.  Today, PRP injection therapy is used for some chronic tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow cases, as well as other cases of tendinitis.  The growth factors and stem cells that concentrated levels of the patient’s platelets activate not only promote more rapid healing but are also found to reduce pain and osteoarthritic symptoms and inflammation.

Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow

“Overuse conditions” affecting the muscles and tendons of the forearm where they attach at the outside of the elbow, tennis elbow (also known as lateral epicondylitis), or inside of the elbow and forearm as in golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis), are generally first addressed with conservative treatment – rest/activity modification, bracing, non steroidal anti inflammatory medication (NSAIDs).  Traditionally, patients continuing to suffer from chronic tennis elbow despite conservative treatment are recommended for surgery to address the affected tendons.  While arthroscopy has made surgical intervention less invasive, PRP therapy offers a non surgical option for chronic tennis elbow sufferers – providing relief for the pain and tenderness associated with the condition.

The Procedure

PRP therapy is a simple in office procedure and does not require a separate visit.  Patients opting for the therapy simply request it during their examination.  Results are usually evident within just a few days.