Don’t Let Injuries Dampen Your Family’s Fourth of July Fun!

Coast to coast, the Fourth of the July is one of the most celebrated holidays of summer and an opportunity to enjoy every bit of what the outdoor has to offer.  Unfortunately there are thousands of injuries incurred across the United States every year at this time, as a result of firework accidents.

Ensuring family fun this Fourth of July.

Ensuring family fun this Fourth of July.

Unofficially, those at highest risk for firework injuries are teenaged boys.  Adult men closely follow in the second highest risk group, according to reports of ER physicians and orthopedic hand specialists….

It is estimated that over 40 percent of firework injuries occur to the hand and upper extremity.

Injuries most commonly occur when an ignited firework seemingly fails to go off, though explodes when checked – often in a hand.  Other injuries occur from the unexpected heat many fireworks omit.  Even an unassuming “sparkler” can heat to over 2000 degrees, capable of causing 2nd and 3rd degree burns.

The fireworks most implicated in causing injury include small firecrackers, bottle rockets and sparklers, because they are the least feared.

Among the most common hand and upper extremity traumatic injuries caused by fireworks include:

  • Burns
  • Contusions and lacerations
  • Damage to bones, muscle, ligaments and nerves 

Medical Attention for a Traumatic Firework Injury

To avoid permanent damage to the hand and wrist, it is important to seek immediate attention for a traumatic firework injury.

With approximately 50 nerves in the hand, 34 muscles moving the fingers and thumb, over 120 known ligaments, 30 major joints, 30 bones and a myriad of connective tendons, it is imperative that you follow up with a hand specialist following an ER or urgent care visit should such an accident happen.

Hand function and quality of life is dependent on not only immediate care but proper follow up to a hand injury.  If such injuries are not adequately addressed, irreversible nerve and tendon damage can impair hand feeling and movement, and the early onset of osteoarthritis from post traumatic bone and joint damage can further hinder hand function.

Reducing Risks of Traumatic Firework Injury

While many of the tips for reducing risk of hand injury trauma from fireworks seem common sense, they are often lost during the festivities surrounding such holidays and warrant repeating.

  • Ignite all fireworks with extended lighters.
  • Remain a safe distance from ignited fireworks.
  • Allow sufficient time for fireworks to go off / explode before approaching (and handle previously ignited fireworks with an extended apparatus such as BBQ tongs).
  • Supervise young children holding sparklers, advise teens of the heat hazard of these and other small, seemingly harmless fireworks.

Have a happy and safe Fourth of the July!

Summer Sideliners

Common summer injuries of the hand, wrist and elbow

As we hike, bike, raft and climb our way through summer adventure, mishaps are bound to happen.  Some of the most common we see include wrist fractures, tennis elbow syndrome and cuts and lacerations to the hand.

Recognizing and treating mishaps that may occur while maximizing these brief few summer months can make a difference in how ready we are for all that awaits us in the fall.

Wrist Fractures

The wrist is susceptible to injury, often used as a first line of defense to break a fall, shield us from impact and soften a blow.  The wrist is comprised of eight small carpal bones, two forearm bones (radius and ulna) and four articulations or joints – which allow the wrist to bend and straighten, move from side-to-side and twist with a broad range of motion.  A force to the hand and wrist may result in a fracture of any one or several of these bones.  While a fracture to one of the smaller carpal bones may only be visible on x-ray, more common distal radius fractures are usually evident – crooked or deformed in appearance.  A wrist fracture may cause pain and swelling and should be immediately addressed.

Tennis Elbow Syndrome (Lateral Epicondylitis)

Though named for the sport frequently causing the condition in tennis players, Tennis Elbow Syndrome is in fact most often caused by everyday activity and diagnosed in those who have never played tennis.  Affecting the outside (lateral) portion of the elbow, tennis elbow syndrome is considered an “overuse” condition.  It is the result of strain placed on the muscles and tendons that attach to the bone.  Also caused by trauma, tennis elbow syndrome can cause pain with gripping, lifting and grasping.

Cuts and Lacerations

Cuts and lacerations to the hand are very common during the summer months as our hands are integral in most outdoor activity and projects. Tendon lacerations are also often the result of trauma to the hand or fingers.  Tendon lacerations may affect either the flexor or extensor tendons.  These types of lacerations often also result in other deep structure damage and require surgical repair.  The cut ends of a tendon must be brought back together in order for the cells inside the tendon to begin the healing/repair process.  Preventing infection in an open wound is also a primary concern with these types of injuries.