Keeping Young Players in the Game This Season …. and the Next

Pitch Count Guidelines and Little League Recommendations

Last month we discussed the increase in injuries among Little Leaguers – particularly the prevalence of “Little Leaguer’s Elbow.”  We continue this discussion in this month’s blog with some of the things that the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) and the USA Baseball, Little League Baseball and Major League Baseball organizations have done to ensure the safe play of our young athletes today….and tomorrow.

Avoiding little league injuries.

Pitch count regulations developed to reduce risk of injury in young players.

 New Recommendations

While curve balls are implicated in throwing injuries of the young athlete, because of inadequate physical development and neuromuscular control, scientific data does not yet support this.  Nonetheless, reducing the use of curve balls in Little League pitching is highly recommended.

Other recommendations include: 

  • Watching and responding to fatigue (decreased ball velocity/accuracy, upright trunk during pitching, dropped elbow during pitching, or increased time between pitches). If a youth pitcher complains of fatigue or looks fatigued, let him rest from pitching and other throwing.
  • No overhead throwing for at least two to three months per year (four months is preferred). No competitive baseball pitching for at least four months per year.
  • No pitching more than 100 innings in games – in any calendar year.
  • Follow limits for pitch counts and days of rest.
  • Avoid pitching on multiple teams with overlapping seasons.
  • Learn good throwing mechanics. First steps should be, in order: 1) basic throwing, 2) fastball pitching, 3) change-up pitching.
  • Avoid using radar guns.
  • A pitcher should not also be a catcher. The pitcher-catcher combination results in many throws and may increase the risk of injury.
  • If a pitcher complains of elbow or shoulder pain, discontinue pitching until evaluated by a sports medicine physician.

Pitch Count

The pitch count restrictions for Little League Baseball were established to reduce the number of overuse throwing injuries among these young players and vary by age.  While the complete pitch count restrictions/recommendations can be reviewed on the ASMI website (www.asmi.org ), below is a listing of the latest Little League “daily” limits.

Daily Limits
17-18 N/A 105/day
15-16 N/A 95/day
13-14 75/game 95/day
11-12 75/game 85/day
9-10 50/game 75/day
7-8 N/A 50/day

(Resources – recommendations and pitch count: American Sports Medicine Institute, Position Statement for Youth Baseball Pitchers http://www.asmi.org/research.php?page=research&section=positionStatement