Unexpected… Pregnancy Related Hand & Wrist Problems, Part 3 (Trigger Finger)

This is the last part of a three-part series on unexpected hand and wrist conditions experienced during pregnancy.  We have focused in this series on three of the most common conditions expectant moms may experience, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, de Quervain’s Tendonitis and Trigger Finger.

Last month we discussed deQuervain’s Tendonitis and the non invasive ways in which we address the condition – and prior to that Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.  In this last part of the series, we focus on Trigger Finger.

Any one of these conditions may be prompted in expectant moms as a result of the hormonal changes, increased blood flow and water retention and swelling in the body during pregnancy.

Trigger Finger is a disorder characterized by snapping and locking of the flexor tendon of the affected finger or thumb. The term Trigger Finger comes from the unlocking of the finger, in which case it pops back suddenly as if releasing a trigger.

Trigger Finger is the result of inflammation of tendons connecting muscles of the forearm to the finger and thumb bones.  This connection permits movement and bending. While in most cases the inflammation is the result of a repetitive or forceful use of the finger or thumb, medical conditions causing a change in tissues – such as pregnancy – may also prompt Trigger Finger.

One of the early symptoms of Trigger Finger is soreness at the base of the finger or thumb, followed by painful clicking or snapping when flexing or extending the affected finger.  Occasionally there may be swelling.  Periods of inactivity may make this worse, though eases with movement.  In more severe cases, the affected finger or thumb may lock in a flexed or extended position – and forced to straighten.  Joint stiffening may eventually occur.

Diagnosing and Treating Trigger Finger

Diagnosing Trigger Finger is done with a physical examination of the hand and assessment of the symptoms.

Treatment for Trigger Finger is generally conservative and may include:

  • Avoiding activity that aggravates the affected finger or thumb
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • A steroid injection into the tendon sheath

If conservative treatment is unable to resolve the condition, a minimally invasive surgical procedure to release the tendon sheath may be indicated.  Expectant women are advised to wait before considering surgical treatment as often times the condition is resolved following pregnancy – when the body resumes normal function.