It’s No Fish Tale – These Uncommon Hand & Upper Extremity Fishing Injuries Can Really Happen!

Located on the Gulf of Mexico and home to hundreds of lakes, it’s no wonder that the Texas coast is the playground to fishing enthusiasts far and wide.

Barracuda

unhook stingray2But even the seasoned sportsman can fall victim to some unlikely fishing injuries affecting the hand and upper extremity. In fact, fishermen (and women) put themselves in danger every time they come into contact with marine life – unpredictable behavior/aggressive and often forceful nature of a catch, prevalence of less commonly treated bacteria, unsanitary tools/equipment, poor wound care – all contributing to some common and not so common injuries that hand specialists see in a region like the Texas Gulf Coast.

Some common fishing injuries and conditions with which a Texas hand surgeon is all too familiar include:

fillet_2Many of these common injuries and conditions are treated non surgically and follow the same treatment protocol as any other patient with the same diagnosis – regardless of the cause.

Uncommon Hand & Upper Extremity Fishing Injuries and Conditions

Though there is very little that surprises a hand specialist practicing in “sportsman’s paradise,” an unusual injury associated with fishing will occasionally make its way to a Texas medical clinic.

Some of these uncommon injuries and conditions include:

  • Sting Ray Laceration
  • Fish Bite / Impalement
  • Fish Handler’s Disease / Bacterial Infection
  • Lodged Fish Bones, Fin Spine 

Unlike other injuries that break the skin, these types of fishing injuries are particularly concerning.  Fish and other marine life carry bacterial infections within their bodies, as well as on their skin, which can affect humans if certain precautions are not taken immediately. Some types of bacteria found in marine life are not commonly seen and do not respond to conventional antibiotics frequently used for infections.

Additionally, some marine life such as the Sting Ray utilize defense mechanisms that require special attention when used against a fisherman.

Sting Ray Laceration
While many sting ray injuries involve an inadvertent encounter between a foot or other lower extremity and a sting ray’s barb, some have occurred to the hand or wrist while trying to remove a sting ray from a fishing net or line.

These types of lacerations require more than bandaging.  Not only do sting ray barbs pierce like a weapon, all sting rays are armed with at least one serrated venomous spine at the base of their whip-like tail.  Short-tail sting rays have two tail spines: a slender spike in front of a large, jagged bayonet (1).

In addition to possible damage to muscle, tendons and nerves that can occur from the physical impalement of a sting ray barb, its venom is comprised of many different substances that can cause tissue to break down and die.
Some of the symptoms that Sting Ray venom can cause include:

 

  • Immediate and severe pain radiating up the affected limb
  • Bleeding and swelling in the affected area
  • Sweating
  • Faintness, dizziness and weakness
  • Low blood pressure
  • Salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Shortness of breath (2)

 

Medical attention is recommended for all sting ray injuries.  Minimally, the wound will be cleaned with warm water to remove the venom and a tetanus booster given if it has been more than five years since the last tetanus booster. Tetanus prevention is required if the patient has never had a tetanus vaccination.  Antibiotics may also be required, and depending on the severity of the injury and amount of damage sustained (often the result of the delay in seeking treatment), surgical intervention to repair soft tissue damage and/or a period of rehabilitation may be required to restore strength to the injured limb (2).

Fish Bite and Impalement
While not every fish injury comes with a venomous double blow, the high risk of bacterial infection and soft tissue damage can be just as serious.  Many fish have sharp teeth, tails and pointed features that can easily break the skin.  Wrestling the unwilling catch onto the boat or beach can leave some sportsmen a bit worse for the wear.

 

Aside from the bacterial concerns that come with marine life, the forceful impact from a sharp feature of the fish can result in soft tissue damage that may require surgical repair and/or months of rehabilitation to restore hand and upper extremity function – as the hand alone is comprised of approximately 34 muscles, 120 known ligaments, and 50 nerves!

 

These types of deep puncture wounds or lacerations in the hand are also at high risk of infection and should be monitored closely.  A delay in the appropriate treatment can lead to complicated tenosynovitis and horseshoe abscess.  Additionally, marine life bacterial infections resulting from Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) do not respond to some conventional antibiotic treatment such as amoxicillin (3).

Fish Handler’s Disease
Not every fishing-related Mycobacterium marinum infection is the result of an obvious injury/wound.  A condition known as Fish Handler’s Disease can impact those frequently handling fish and generally affects the hands.  Any inconspicuous cut or small opening on the skin can allow the bacteria to enter the body.  The bacteria’s inability to proliferate in the warm body confines it to the affected area.

 

Common symptoms include swelling, tenderness, and bluish-purple spots. Fish Handler’s Disease is treated with special antibiotics used specifically for this type of bacterial infection.  Recovery can take months.

Lodged Fish Bones, Fin Spine
Occasionally in the handling of fish a fish bone or fin spine can lodge in the hand. Though this may not be painful or immediately worrisome to the injured party, these types of injuries are concerning.  Such injuries often leave residual fragments of foreign organic matter in the soft tissue, which can cause secondary infections such as Staphylococci and Streptococci (4).

 

Typically, x-rays are used first to try and identify a foreign body in the tissue, though are not always successful in doing so.  An MRI may be indicated to identify fine fin spines and tiny bones lodged in the body’s tissue. The surgical removal of the foreign body is important.  Failure to seek and remove the foreign body may lead to persistence of infection (4). Multiple surgical procedures may be required, and the patient is put on antibiotics to prevent infection. Physical therapy may be required after surgery to regain mobility of the hand.

 

If this type of injury goes untreated it can result in permanent disability and hospitalization for infection. Though the area may look as if it has healed, but is still tender, swollen, discolored, or abnormal in any way, individuals are urged to see a hand specialist.

 

Prevention and Precaution
Understanding the unique aspects of the marine life occupying the waters you’re sporting and utilizing protective gloves and garments while fishing can go a long way in injury prevention.  As the largest organ of the human body, our skin serves as a protective barrier.  When any area is compromised, our entire body is compromised. Individuals with other health conditions, such as diabetes or immune deficiency disorders should be particularly cautious and consult a hand specialist for proper wound care.

If not addressed properly, even seemingly minor fishing injuries can result in serious infection, lingering weakness or permanent disability – inhibiting participation in the sport you love.

 

References

 

How Your “Musculoskeletal Mindset” Can Impact Injury Risk at Work

While the study of orthopedics has traditionally placed emphasis on the physical influencers impacting our bones, tendons, ligaments and other surrounding soft tissue comprising the musculoskeletal system, new research now spotlights the increasingly important role of workplace “psychosocial” factors on musculoskeletal disorders (MSD).Tired man being overloaded at work

According to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), a workplace psychosocial factor is defined as “a non-physical aspect of the workplace that is developed by the culture, policies, expectations and social attitude of the organization.” [1]

Basically, psychosocial factors umbrella the different emotional responses to the demands placed on workers while performing their job –  including frustration, dissatisfaction, depression and despair. The resulting stress induces physiological responses that can contribute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders.

New research reported by the CCOHS identifies some physiological responses to psychosocial factors, including:

  • Increased blood pressure, which in small joint spaces can increase pressure on tendons, ligaments and nerves.
  • Increased fluid pressure over a prolonged period of time can also increase pressure in joints and on surrounding soft tissue as well as the carpal tunnel.
  • Reduction of growth functions can reduce production of collagen and consequently the body’s ability to heal or recover after performing work functions.
  • Over time a decreased sensitivity to pain can prompt workers to work beyond their body’s physical capacity, predisposing it to injury.
  • Increased muscle tension can increase pressure on and around the joints and may cause excessive use of force during certain activities and movements.
  • The body’s heightened state of sensitivity may overburden the musculoskeletal system by prompting a person to lift more, work faster, etc.

It is difficult in our current healthcare environment to directly attribute “workplace psychosocial factors” as a cause of workplace MSD, because of the many other factors that contribute to such disorders/injuries (biomechanical, etc.). Increasingly, though, evidence and newly published scientific research studies are helping to spotlight the role that these factors play, and the link between “stress induced physiological changes” and musculoskeletal disorders.

Additionally, a growing number of research studies are reporting a link between emotional disorders (anxiety, depression) and medical and surgical complication rates, lower patient satisfaction scores and readmission risk in joint replacement patients. [2,3]

There will likely be much more research on these topics in the coming years.

This new information underscores the importance of identifying and addressing psychological stressors and our response to them, as they are proving to have a significant impact on not only the cardiovascular but also the musculoskeletal system – two vital contributors to overall health and well-being.

 

References

  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), cchos.ca , https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/psychosocial/musculoskeletal.html .
  • Wood TJ, Thornley P, Petruccelli D, et al. Preoperative predictors of pain catastrophizing, anxiety and depression in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2016 Dec;31(12):2750-2756.
  • Gold HT, Slover JD, Joo L, et al. Association of depression with 90-day hospital readmission after total joint arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2016 Nov;31(11):2385-2388.

 

 

What Spring and Summer Mean to Our Musculoskeletal Health

Spring has finally arrived and time isn’t the only thing jumping forward.  Our enthusiasm for the outdoors is renewed and our activity schedule is ramped up.  From the slopes to spring sports, new plantings and training for one of the biggest bike rides in Texas, the potential for overuse injuries is particularly high this time of year – following less active winter months.

Some of the musculoskeletal injuries and conditions most commonly seen in the spring and summer months include:

  • Skier’s Thumb
  • Friction Blisters
  • Allergy-Related Muscle Fatigue / Joint Pain
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Golfer’s Elbow

Skier’s Thumb

Though the skies and poles are packed away, signs of a common injury following an active ski season may linger a bit longer.  Skier’s thumb, also known as Texter’s Thumb skiers-thumb gardening cycling MLB: Oakland Athletics at Chicago White Sox golfing tennisamong millennials, refers to injury of the unlar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb’s metacarpal phalangeal (MP) joint.  This occurs when the abnormal pulling of the thumb, such as that from a fall or harsh pull while affixed to the ski pole/hoop, causes a forced abduction or hyperextension of the proximal phalanx of the thumb. If unaddressed, this injury is further exacerbated by the repetitive use of the injured thumb in texting.

Friction Blisters

While the most common concerns during baseball season include pitch count and the stress that excessive pitching and throwing has on a player’s elbow and shoulder over the course of a baseball season, these generally occur mid to late season following many practices and games.

A lesser known injury often occurs as the season gets started and impacts pitchers in particular – friction blisters.   The repeated trauma created between the baseball seams and the fingers of the pitching hand, predominately at the tips of the index and long fingers, can result in friction blisters.

Friction blisters, which are the result of repetitive friction and strain forces that develop between the skin and various objects, are also common this time of year among those increasing gardening efforts and tennis players hitting the court.

Friction blisters form in areas where the “stratum corneum” and “stratum granulosum” are sufficiently robust such as the palmar and plantar surfaces of the hands and feet [1].

 

Allergy-Related Muscle Fatigue / Joint Pain

With the vibrant colors of spring come seasonal allergies and a host of symptoms that can sometimes make involvement in many of these long-awaited activities a challenge.  While pollen allergies most commonly cause nasal congestion, a runny nose, a sore/scratchy throat and itchy eyes, they can also cause hives, itchy skin, chronic cough, mood changes and body aches/muscle and joint pain. After exposure to pollen, the body reacts to it as a foreign invader by releasing antibodies and natural chemicals called histamines. Histamine is a substance that causes inflammation in the body. Sometimes allergies can advance to bronchitis and mimic flu-like symptoms, including a low-grade fever, body aches and muscle fatigue which can make everyday activity and exercise more challenging if unaddressed. Continuing to train or play while the body fights to overcome allergy challenges can predispose the musculoskeletal system to injury.

 Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common overuse conditions seen in hand and upper extremity orthopedic care.  In the spring and summer, it is often the result of new activity excessively engaging the hand and wrist such as gardening and cycling. It is generally the result of irritation and swelling, which causes compression within the narrow carpal tunnel located at the wrist – through which one of the major nerves in the arm, the median nerve, passes.  This nerve becomes irritated in the compressed tunnel and can cause numbness, pain, tingling and weakness in the thumb, index and middle fingers.  CTS can come on quickly and command attention or linger with varying degrees of pain that becomes gradually more intense over time.

Another hand and wrist condition, Handlebar Palsy, also known medically as ulnar neuropathy, is an overuse or repetitive stress condition that affects cyclists, though generally after completion of a long, competitive ride.  It is the result of direct pressure placed on the ulnar nerve at the hand and wrist – from the grip of a cyclist’s hands on handlebars, causing stretching or hyperextension of the nerve.

 

Golfer’s Elbow

While the greens are rarely bare in Houston, golfing tournaments really ramp up in the spring and so too do one of the most common overuse conditions associated with the sport – Golfer’s Elbow.  Also known as medial epicondylitis, Golfer’s Elbow affects the muscles and tendons on the inside (medial) portion of the elbow. The repeated activity of swinging the golf club places strain on the elbow, irritating and inflaming the tendons and muscles at the elbow joint.  This inflammation can cause pain on the inside of the elbow, as well as in the forearm and wrist.

 Preventing Injury

Easing into new activity gradually and preparing appropriately can reduce risk of overuse injuries and conditions.  Strengthening muscle groups equally and stretching sufficiently both before and after activity are key, particularly after less active winter months.

Ensuring proper equipment (cycling and other ergonomic gloves and tools) and products (moisturizing to reduce calluses and blister risk) can protect the parts of the body most vulnerable to some of these spring activities and sports. Behavior/activity modification can also help to distribute stress to different parts of the body, reducing repetitive impact on one particular area.

While allergies are often unavoidable, antihistamines and corticosteroids can reduce symptoms and improve performance.  Understanding the associated muscle fatigue and joint pain will help you modify activity accordingly to avoid injury.

Periodically resting and refraining from the activity causing pain can help restore limb strength and prevent more serious injury or damage to the affected area.

 References

[1] McNamara AR, Ensell S, Farley TD. Hand Blisters in Major League Baseball Pitchers: Current Concepts and Management. Am J Orthop. 2016 March;45(3):134-36.

Handlebar Hazards

Repetitive Stress Hand & Wrist Conditions Affecting Cyclists

As training begins for the upcoming MS150, we thought we’d talk about some of the common overuse, or repetitive stress, hand and wrist conditions affecting cyclists.  By discussing some of these conditions and ways to reduce your risk, hopefully we can ensure pain free cycling and play a hand in many successful rides.

How Repetitive Stress Occurs
Avid cyclists competing year round in weekend rides and races tend to experience various types of overuse strains and stress associated with such a sport – nearly one-third of these

Hyperextended Wrist

affect the hand and upper extremity.  Despite the best equipment and preventive measures, the jarring vibration of a rough terrain, handlebar hand positioning for hours at a time or tense ride into the wind can result in such repetitive stress conditions as carpal tunnel syndrome or handlebar palsy (also known as ulnar neuropathy).  Cold weather also makes tissue more distensible and may slightly increase risk for carpal tunnel syndrome as well.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Hyper Flexion of Wrist

One of the most common tendinopathic conditions associated with overuse activity and repetitive stress in the hand and wrist is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS).  CTS is the result of irritation and swelling, which causes compression within the narrow carpal tunnel located at the wrist – through which one of the major nerves in the arm, the median nerve, passes. CTS is one of the most common overuse hand and wrist conditions affecting cyclists. When the median nerve becomes irritated in this inflamed and compressed tunnel, numbness, pain, tingling and weakness may result in the thumb, index and middle fingers – causing discomfort and affecting a cyclist’s ability to even shift gears with the affected hand.  Resting periodically and stretching the hands, changing grip to reduce hyperextension and hyper flexion may help during the ride, but ongoing pain may require treatment – which is generally nonsurgical and may entail night bracing and/or injection therapy.  CTS pain remaining unresolved following nonsurgical treatment may require a minimally invasive Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release.

Handlebar Palsy (Ulnar Neuropathy)
Handlebar palsy, known medically as ulnar neuropathy, is another common overuse or repetitive stress condition affecting cyclists.  It is the result of direct pressure placed on the ulnar nerve at the hand and wrist – from the grip of a cyclist’s hands on handlebars, causing stretching or hyperextension of the nerve.  The ulnar nerve controls sensation in the ring and little fingers as well as the muscular function of the hand.  Compression of it may result in numbness and tingling in the ring and little fingers and/or hand weakness. Nonsurgical treatment such as rest, stretching exercises, and anti-inflammatory medications can generally resolve this condition.

These overuse, repetitive stress conditions affecting bicyclists also often affect motorcyclists – as the continuous vibration of the motorcycle causes the same type of conditions long rides and regular bicycling can cause.

Reducing Your Risks
Decades of cycling enthusiasts have contributed to an array of preventive cycling gear and recommendations for reducing a fellow cyclist’s risk for such conditions.  These include everything from basic and specialized gel cycling gloves to additional handlebar padding and adjustments in handlebar height and overall bike fit specific to each rider.

Applying less pressure or weight to the handlebars and avoiding hyperextension and hyper flexion, along with frequent adjustments to grip and position on the handlebars, should reduce risk for carpal tunnel syndrome and handlebar palsy.

Figures source:  http://www.hughston.com/hha/a_15_3_2.htm