Summer Sideliners

Common summer injuries of the hand, wrist and elbow

As we hike, bike, raft and climb our way through summer adventure, mishaps are bound to happen.  Some of the most common we see include wrist fractures, tennis elbow syndrome and cuts and lacerations to the hand.

Recognizing and treating mishaps that may occur while maximizing these brief few summer months can make a difference in how ready we are for all that awaits us in the fall.

Wrist Fractures

The wrist is susceptible to injury, often used as a first line of defense to break a fall, shield us from impact and soften a blow.  The wrist is comprised of eight small carpal bones, two forearm bones (radius and ulna) and four articulations or joints – which allow the wrist to bend and straighten, move from side-to-side and twist with a broad range of motion.  A force to the hand and wrist may result in a fracture of any one or several of these bones.  While a fracture to one of the smaller carpal bones may only be visible on x-ray, more common distal radius fractures are usually evident – crooked or deformed in appearance.  A wrist fracture may cause pain and swelling and should be immediately addressed.

Tennis Elbow Syndrome (Lateral Epicondylitis)

Though named for the sport frequently causing the condition in tennis players, Tennis Elbow Syndrome is in fact most often caused by everyday activity and diagnosed in those who have never played tennis.  Affecting the outside (lateral) portion of the elbow, tennis elbow syndrome is considered an “overuse” condition.  It is the result of strain placed on the muscles and tendons that attach to the bone.  Also caused by trauma, tennis elbow syndrome can cause pain with gripping, lifting and grasping.

Cuts and Lacerations

Cuts and lacerations to the hand are very common during the summer months as our hands are integral in most outdoor activity and projects. Tendon lacerations are also often the result of trauma to the hand or fingers.  Tendon lacerations may affect either the flexor or extensor tendons.  These types of lacerations often also result in other deep structure damage and require surgical repair.  The cut ends of a tendon must be brought back together in order for the cells inside the tendon to begin the healing/repair process.  Preventing infection in an open wound is also a primary concern with these types of injuries.